Web Development Theory

Brendan Eich is currently the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of Mozilla. However, prior to that he has a more important designation attached to his name – JavaScript founder. Yes, it is Brendan Eich whose brainchild is the JavaScript scripting programming language. JavaScript language is used by millions of web developers to create user-friendly, responsive interfaces over the web. While speaking at the O’Reilly Fluent Conference in San Francisco, Brendan Eich shared his feelings about the road to web development. He thinks the JavaScript developers or web developers have a tough job to do and he really means it. Being a JavaScript developer, a person has to face a lot of challenges and spend sleepless nights.

He compared the web developers with the character Ash played by the actor Bruce Campbell in the popular horror movie of the 1980s “Evil Dead”. Brendan Eich was excited by the way the movie character used his hand as a chainsaw to cut things. The idea of improving JavaScript came in his mind after seeing “Evil Dead”. At the O’Reilly Fluent Conference Brendan Eich said “To be a Web developer, you have to be tough like Ash. JavaScript is kind of a chainsaw you have in place of a hand on the Web”. He also said he strongly believes web development has always been tough and even today it is not a matter of joke.

Brendan Eich defined ECMAscript 6 specification as the “high road” for JavaScript. He shared his experience of seeing the ECMAscript 6 specification used in almost all top browsers by the various web development leaders. The ECMAscript 6 specification is currently available in the marketplace for anyone to use the same in the browsers. According to Eich, web developers actually make notable changes in the “ECMAScript” to fill any discrepancy in the language without actually altering the JavaScript to another language. Thus, web developers don’t need to look at pre-compilers or trans-compilers with the availability of the ECMAScript 6 specification since this specification gives them the golden opportunity to make necessary changes within the language and outside of it as well in the most productive manner.